Get Your Travel Plans Together for a Mental Break This (COVID) Summer  

There’s only 13 weeks in the summer and a portion of this precious sun-drenched time is already going away.  

So how do we use this time to the best of our advantage, especially during the pandemic, even with vaccination efforts growing and positivity rates lowering?  

According to www.chop.edu, it’s all about perspective and keeping up the normalcy, as safely as possible, even during the pandemic times we’re in.  

Regardless, though, self-improvement can continue to stay at the top of mind along with partaking in fun-filled vacations and activities that will keep people mentally and physically fit.  

The website shared some tips to navigate this second pandemic summer.  

  

Travel light?  

Can people travel during the pandemic? Per Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, it is safe for fully vaccinated people to travel within the United States without testing or self-quarantining. Scientists are still discovering how vaccines will affect the spread of COVID-19, but it’s vital that even fully vaccinated individuals continue to follow safety protocols in public, including wearing a mask (except in certain uncrowded places), practicing physical distancing, washing hands frequently and avoiding crowds.   

If, however, you’re planning to travel with unvaccinated family members, reduce the risk of COVID-19 infection by being vigilant and following these tips:  

  • Select short road trips in a private vehicle with only members of one’s immediate household or fully vaccinated people. Bring food to make fewer stops along the journey.  
  • If the only option is plane travel, make an effort to take a flight with no layovers and head straight to the gate.  
  • Stay away from long-distance bus trips and cruises.  
  • If this is an option, select a private rental home over multiunit places like hotels.  
  • Think about visiting a fully vaccinated family member’s household.  
  • Select takeout, drive-thru, or curbside delivery versus restaurants or self-service buffets.   
  • Pack an abundance of supplies like hand wipes and sanitizers, and use consistently. Ensure masks are worn at all times and bring back-ups, along with a plastic bag to store old masks.  
  • Stay up-to-date about infection rates in the area of travel.  

Can children have play dates or go to a pool?  

Social connectivity is a must, especially for children growing up in a (hopefully short-lived) pandemic. Yet when determining which type of playdate is good for a child, weigh the pros and the cons to reduce the potential exposure to viruses and other ills.  

  • Host one-on-one playdate outings or events rather than multi-family groups.  
  • Keep the number of contacts your child has to a minimum.  
  • Keep the play dates outside (as weather permits).  
  • Encourage activities that require children to move around and promote social distancing – activities like biking are ideal.  
  • Children should wear masks, inside and outside.  
  • Avoid sharing snacks.  
  • Wash hands or use hand sanitizer regularly.  
  • Swimming in a backyard pool with siblings or a couple of close friends is safer than a large community and/or public pool. 

Staying safe this summer can be an experience the whole family can take part in by reminding each other of gentle tips and rules to keep the trip virus-free and memory-filled.  

For more information visit https://www.chop.edu/news/health-tip/tips-safe-fun-summer-during-covid-19-pandemic. 

 

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