Donald Trump gets a win with controversial remarks

NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 16:   Business mogul Donald Trump gives a speech as he announces his candidacy for the U.S. presidency at Trump Tower on June 16, 2015 in New York City.  Trump is the 12th Republican who has announced running for the White House.  (Photo by Christopher Gregory/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY – JUNE 16: Business mogul Donald Trump gives a speech as he announces his candidacy for the U.S. presidency at Trump Tower on June 16, 2015 in New York City. Trump is the 12th Republican who has announced running for the White House. (Photo by Christopher Gregory/Getty Images)

Political analysts and trusted news outlets have revealed that Donald Trump’s approval ratings amongst the Republicans are still gaining steam.

So much so, that he is currently rumored and in contention to be the GOP’s candidate in the upcoming 2016 presidential election. Ted Cruz, Jeb Bush and Ben Carson aren’t even close according to the polls.

No, this isn’t a joke.

“I don’t have a racist bone in my body,” Trump said to Entertainment Tonight, while defending himself regarding his perceived racist comments. “The fact that I want a strong border and the fact that I don’t want illegal immigrants pouring into this country, that doesn’t make me a racist, it means I love this country and I want to save this country.”

Even in light of his controversial statements regarding those of Arab and Hispanic decent, the self-induced public scrutiny hasn’t lasted long for Trump when considering the number of supporters that he has gained.

“I never singled out Mexico,” Trump said in reflection of his statements regarding his political agenda. “What I said is that people are coming across the border and they are coming through Mexico. Mexico is doing very little to stop it, that I can tell you. They are coming from all over the place, but it’s illegal immigration. They come in unlawfully and there is tremendous crime around the people that are coming in.”

Despite a slight drop in support on the final night of the survey, Trump was the favorite of 24 percent of registered Republicans and Republican-leaning independents.

Undeniably, this is the highest percentage and greatest lead recorded by any GOP candidate this year across many polls. This marks a six fold increase in his support since late May, shortly before he formally joined the race.

How is this so? It is simple.

There is an underlining problem brewing in America’s political agenda. There is a large group of Americans that actually agree with Trump.

His words represent the thoughts of many.

No one is denying Trump’s business acumen and successes over the years, but this is something different. This recent surge in Trump’s approval ratings means something deeper than the age-old political battle between the right and left wings of America’s trusted two party political system.

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